Order for
Your shopping cart is empty. Click on "My Account" for Renewal Information. Or Click "Tickets" to find events.
  Emporium Presents:

Cody Johnson
 

Saturday, October 6th, 2018 at 6:00pm 

Doors open 4:30 PM

Early Bird Ticket Sales,
start Wed., May 2 at 10am:  $22.50

General Admission: $27.50


Rain or Shine | All Ages | Alcohol with 21/ID
Additional Service Fees and taxes apply. Tickets are nonrefundable unless event is canceled and not rescheduled/relocated.
Cody Johnson VIP : $78
includes

Early Venue Access
VIP Bar separate from the rest of the crowd
Premium View of Stage
When Cody Johnson’s Cowboy Like Me debuted in the Top 10 on the Billboard Country Albums chart in January 2014, jaws dropped in offices all over Nashville.

“I got a lot of ‘Who is this kid?’” Johnson says with a laugh two years later. “I love that. That was a new horizon. And I’m gonna work to make sure people know exactly who I am.”

Johnson does that from the start in Gotta Be Me, a follow-up project that’s loaded with solid country instrumentation and winsome melodies. In the first minute alone, he paints himself as a cowboy, raised on outlaw country, who drinks too much, fights too much and won’t apologize for having an opinion. By the time the 14-track journey is over, he’s shared his rodeo history in “The Only One I Know (Cowboy Life),” demonstrated his woman’s influence in “With You I Am” and paid homage to his gospel heritage in “I Can’t Even Walk.”

“I’m a God-fearin’, hard-workin’, beer-drinkin’, fightin’, lovin’ cowboy from Texas,” he grins. “That’s about it.”

At a young age, Johnson was given the tools to eventually work in local clubs, though his official education was grounded in the church. His father played drums for their congregation, and that was likewise the first instrument that young Cody picked up.

“Learning drums first taught me about feeling the song – feeling that dynamic of when it’s supposed to be big and when it’s supposed to be soft,” he says. “I think that still sticks with me as a songwriter and as a performer, and in turn it’s helped me shape my band, because I know what I’m looking for on every front.”

Johnson learned guitar next, his first band finished runner-up in a Texas State FFA talent contest. He briefly went to Angelina College in Lufkin, Texas, but traded that in to become a rodeo pro. Cody started recording his own music during that phase of his life, beginning with Black And White Label, which featured his dad, Carl, on drums.
 
Eventually, Cody took a job at the prison to pay the bills. His band kept hitting the clubs on the weekend, with Johnson kept banging away on the guitar on Fridays and Saturdays. His weekend crowds began to grow, and Johnson started landing hits on the Texas music charts. After the release of his third album, he won New Male Vocalist of the Year in the Texas Regional Radio Music Awards.

Johnson reached a new creative plateau when he enlisted singer/songwriter Trent Willmon, who wrote Montgomery Gentry’s “Lucky Man,” to produce an album in Nashville. That project, A Different Day, raised the bar on Johnson’s barroom ambitions. The studio musicians he worked with challenged his own band. Johnson grew – and his bandmates grew – because they had to stretch themselves to live up to the album on the road. That pattern has continued through three projects as he continues to chase something illusory.

He approached Gotta Be Me with two major objectives: to make yet another advance musically, and to provide an authentic self-portrait to that growing fan base still trying to figure out who this Cody Johnson guy really is. He worked with some of Nashville’s best songwriters while drawing on his own history, rich with its own compelling subject matter.

In essence, Gotta Be Me documents the life of a guy who’s lived in the fast lane as a beer-drinkin’, rodeo-ridin’ cowboy, but who’s also seen just enough darkness to temper that wild streak.
“You’re only a couple bad decisions every day from screwing your whole life up,” he reasons.
With a good woman behind him and a whole lot of promise in front of him, that’s enough to keep Cody Johnson in check. The energy he put into his rebel years now goes into his work. When it’s all said and done, the plan is mostly to reach the point where people are no longer asking “Who is this kid?”

“I don’t want to be a blemish on country music,” Cody Johnson says. “I don’t want to be a dot. I’d like to be a mark.”

 

Promotional Code

  • If you have a promotion code, please enter it here.